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Is 60 Days The New 100 Days When You’re Thrust Into A New Role?

Is 60 Days The New 100 Days When You’re Thrust Into A New Role?

25 Jul by OnTalent

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There’s nothing quite like embarking on a new role for most people (providing they weren’t somehow forced into it, of course). Most of us can think back to a time when we began a new journey in a workplace and gave it everything we had, especially if it was a role we’d been working towards for quite some time.

In the circles I’m involved in and gravitate towards, there’s a new trend emerging: 60 days is the new 100 days in the workplace.

When commencing any new role within a company, often, we talk about 90 or 100-day plans. Generally speaking, this is the amount of time it takes us to gear up for success; understand the strategy, build relationships with those we need to, understand the main aspects of the business, become accustomed to the team and how each different member works, consider the future and contemplate the actions that we may recommend moving forward.

For those looking to excel in the workplace, that 90 to 100 days of breathing space is now looking more like 60 days realistically speaking. Remember, everything is moving at such a rapid pace these days thanks to the constant evolution of technology. We all need things to happen quicker and it’s impacting the way we need to adapt in terms of our mindset.

My advice to anyone who finds themselves in a new role in 2018 is to have your 60-day thinking map and planning completed prior to actually commencing in the new role. Of course, this plan needs to be flexible, and it’s likely to change quite a bit once you’re officially in your new role. However, regardless of what you find yourself doing these days, you need to be able to learn quickly, adapt on the go, avoid jumping to early conclusions without having all necessary information on-hand, and present your findings with a focused purpose.

When I work with clients who find themselves in this position, I ask them to consider the following questions:

  • Why were you selected for this new role?
  • What are you personally wanting to achieve and do?

Both are essential to your success and if you haven’t set your answers in stone prior to commencing, you’re going in blind. Think back to past roles and consider what you could have done differently and any learnings that you can now bring to your new position. We may not want to look backwards especially if it wasn’t smooth sailing, but often, our mistakes and the lessons learnt prevent us from repeating history.

If you’re struggling to navigate your way through a career move or transition, consider reaching out to a coach who can help you to crystallise your thinking and put a plan in place that considers what you’re doing right now, where you want to go and how you’re going to get there.

Wishing you all career success in 2018!.

 By Deborah Wilson

Deborah Wilson is a Thought Leader in Executive Careers. She takes a personalised approach to strategic career coaching and career transitions, mentoring, and leadership development. Deborah provides expert guidance for individuals while supporting organisations through change and connecting people and purpose. Call Deborah on +61 403 779 746.